What's It All About, eh?

Cape Breton evokes deep memories and strong emotions for me as well as a deep appreciation for the beauty of my adopted island. My hopes are that you too might find the photos evocative - maybe a view you've not enjoyed before, or an 'Oh I've been there', or if from away that you may be encouraged to visit this fair isle so that you might come to love and breathe Cape Breton as I do. One word about place names that I use - some are completely local usage while others are from maps of Cape Breton that I've purchased over the years. I frequently post travel and other photos that are of interest to me - and hopefully you.

On the right hand side bar find my take on Single Malt whiskey - from how to best enjoy this noble drink to reviews (in a most non-professional manner) of ones that I have tried and liked - or not. Also musings, mine and others, on life in general.

Photographs are roughly 98%+ my own and copy-righted. For the occasional photo that is borrowed, credit is given where possible - recently I have started posting unusual net photographs that seem unique. Feel free to borrow any of my photos for non-commercial use, otherwise contact me. Starting late in 2013 I have tried to be consistent in identifying my photographs using ©smck on all out of camera photos I personally captured - (I often do very minor computer changes such as 'crop' or 'shadow' etc but usually nothing major), and using
©norvellhimself on all photos that I have played around with in case it might not be obvious.

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Lovely Wind Turbines









I believe this is The Amherst Wind Farm commissioned in April of 2012 in Cumberland County near the New Brunswick-Nova Scotia Border - as this was where I was traveling when I took this photograph -  the farm hosts 15 Suzlon S97 turbines with a capacity of 2.1 MW each with a total capacity of 31.5 MW.

The Luck of the Draw








This old dead gum gave up the ghost and crashed across my drive while I was out this a.m. - I had walked under it twice about an hour before but luckily it stayed intact at the time.

Finished Today




The intense heat and humidity of the last few days slowed down the completion of the permanent portion of the wind-break for out bee hives but all but one board on the east wing are now done providing both protection from the wintry gales that howl around our front yard in the winter and provide a small privacy to the bees from the lane.

Black Velvet Bolete - Tylopilus alboatur



The black velvet bolete is listed as a choice edible mushroom so I may have misidentified this Bolete because after satisfying myself that this was the Black Velvet (and since it was a bolete that was not brusing blue upon being opened - as in the last photo - I did not bother with a spore identification as I knew that the worst that could be was a non-palatable taste upon cooking) I brushed it clean and removed the porous sponge-like gill section then sliced the lovely white meat of the crown into small pieces and using olive oil gently grilled these for five to ten minutes.  When I chewed one small section the taste was quite bitter so I spate it out and rinsed my mouth with water, put the cooked and un-cooked pieces in the compost and washed the round iron grill, that I had used, very carefully.  It might have been just my own personal reaction to that particular mushroom and that it was identified correctly or maybe it was just a Black Bolete look-a-like - for sure next time I will do a spore identification first

Like Humans, Different Shapes and Sizes


Wait For ME


I've Got The Old Cub By Thirty Years


Id


Beauty


Pigskin Poison Puffball - Scleroderma citrinum Poisonous




The Old Shed Alive With light


One More


Poised For Flight


The Silver Dart

I called this posting The Silver Dart because of the sheen of the dragon-fly's wings not because I recognized the type;

"The dragonfly has been a subject of intrigue in every single continent it is found in, and with each civilization, has developed a unique meaning to it, its behavior and its lifestyle.The word Dragonfly and the family it belongs to, Odonata, have evolved from the many myths associated with Dragonflies and their taxonomic cousins, the Damselflies.  The word Dragonfly has its source in the myth that Dragonflies were once Dragons.

The family name Odonata comes from the Greek word for tooth as Odonates were believed to have teeth, it is a verified fact now that while they don’t have ‘teeth’ per say, they have strong mandibles that they use to crush their prey.

The dragonfly normally lives most of its life as a nymph or an immature. It flies only for a fraction of its life and usually not more than a few months. This adult dragonfly does it all in these few months and leaves nothing to be desired.
The eyes of the dragonfly are amazing and awe inspiring. Almost 80% of the insect’s brain power is dedicated to its sight.  It can see in all 360 degrees around it."

 


The dragonfly has been a subject of intrigue in every single continent it is found in, and with each civilization, has developed a unique meaning to it, its behavior and its lifestyle.
The word Dragonfly and the family it belongs to, Odonata, have evolved from the many myths associated with Dragonflies and their taxonomic cousins, the Damselflies.  The word Dragonfly has its source in the myth that Dragonflies were once Dragons.
The family name Odonata comes from the Greek word for tooth as Odonates were believed to have teeth, it is a verified fact now that while they don’t have ‘teeth’ per say, they have strong mandibles that they use to crush their prey.
- See more at: http://www.dragonfly-site.com/meaning-symbolize.html#sthash.ydWXqvDU.dpuf
The dragonfly has been a subject of intrigue in every single continent it is found in, and with each civilization, has developed a unique meaning to it, its behavior and its lifestyle.
The word Dragonfly and the family it belongs to, Odonata, have evolved from the many myths associated with Dragonflies and their taxonomic cousins, the Damselflies.  The word Dragonfly has its source in the myth that Dragonflies were once Dragons.
The family name Odonata comes from the Greek word for tooth as Odonates were believed to have teeth, it is a verified fact now that while they don’t have ‘teeth’ per say, they have strong mandibles that they use to crush their prey.
- See more at: http://www.dragonfly-site.com/meaning-symbolize.html#sthash.ydWXqvDU.dpuf
The dragonfly has been a subject of intrigue in every single continent it is found in, and with each civilization, has developed a unique meaning to it, its behavior and its lifestyle.
The word Dragonfly and the family it belongs to, Odonata, have evolved from the many myths associated with Dragonflies and their taxonomic cousins, the Damselflies.  The word Dragonfly has its source in the myth that Dragonflies were once Dragons.
The family name Odonata comes from the Greek word for tooth as Odonates were believed to have teeth, it is a verified fact now that while they don’t have ‘teeth’ per say, they have strong mandibles that they use to crush their prey.
- See more at: http://www.dragonfly-site.com/meaning-symbolize.html#sthash.ydWXqvDU.dpuf